All Souls: A Family Story from Southie

All Souls A Family Story from Southie A breakaway bestseller since its first printing All Souls takes us deep into Michael Patrick MacDonald s Southie the proudly insular neighborhood with the highest concentration of white poverty in A

  • Title: All Souls: A Family Story from Southie
  • Author: Michael Patrick MacDonald
  • ISBN: 9780807071984
  • Page: 457
  • Format: ebook
  • A breakaway bestseller since its first printing, All Souls takes us deep into Michael Patrick MacDonald s Southie, the proudly insular neighborhood with the highest concentration of white poverty in America Rocked by Whitey Bulger s crime schemes and busing riots, MacDonald s Southie is populated by sharply hewn characters like his Ma, a miniskirted, accordion playing sinA breakaway bestseller since its first printing, All Souls takes us deep into Michael Patrick MacDonald s Southie, the proudly insular neighborhood with the highest concentration of white poverty in America Rocked by Whitey Bulger s crime schemes and busing riots, MacDonald s Southie is populated by sharply hewn characters like his Ma, a miniskirted, accordion playing single mother who endures the deaths of four of her eleven children Nearly suffocated by his grief and his community s code of silence, MacDonald tells his family story here with gritty but moving honesty.

    All Souls, Langham Place This site uses cookies If you continue to use the site you agree to this For details please see our cookies policy. All Souls Day In Christianity, All Souls Day commemorates All Souls, the Holy Souls, or the Faithful Departed that is, the souls of Christians who have died Observing Christians typically remember deceased relatives on the day In Western Christianity the annual celebration is now held on November and is associated with the three days of Allhallowtide, including All Saints Day November and its All Souls Church Unitarian a diverse, spirit growing Welcome All Souls is a progressive religious community in the heart of DC, at the intersection of Mt Pleasant, Adams Morgan, and Columbia Heights. All Souls Anglican Church, Leichhardt Hello and welcome We are a Bible based church community in the wonderfully diverse inner west of Sydney We welcome anyone who wants to discover Jesus or know and serve him better in our church and neighbourhood. Welcome to All Souls All Souls Parish No matter who you are or where you are on the spiritual journey, you are welcome here We invite people looking for healing, love, forgiveness, and acceptance, and seeking to find or recover a spiritual home in Christian community, including families, children, young people, older people, couples, singles, and gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people. All Souls Unitarian Church Tulsa Our church is a welcoming community Each Sunday morning we come together to be reconnected to life s ultimate concerns. All Souls College, Oxford The All Souls Library formally known as the Codrington Library was founded through a bequest from Christopher Codrington , a Fellow of the College Christopher Codrington bequeathed books worth ,, in addition to , in currency This bequest allowed the library to All Souls Bolton All Souls Bolton A Place That Inspires A place that inspires All Souls is a fantastic mix of breath taking architecture and ultra modern facilities. All Souls A Family Story from Southie Michael Patrick A breakaway bestseller since its first printing, All Souls takes us deep into Michael Patrick MacDonald s Southie, the proudly insular neighborhood with the highest concentration of white poverty in America The anti busing riots of forever changed Southie, Boston s working class Irish community, branding it as a violent, racist enclave. All Souls College, Oxford Creatures of all sizes have evolved to move through fluid environments I am interested in combining theory and experiment to understand the challenges and

    • ✓ All Souls: A Family Story from Southie || ☆ PDF Read by ✓ Michael Patrick MacDonald
      457 Michael Patrick MacDonald
    • thumbnail Title: ✓ All Souls: A Family Story from Southie || ☆ PDF Read by ✓ Michael Patrick MacDonald
      Posted by:Michael Patrick MacDonald
      Published :2018-07-11T00:24:55+00:00

    One thought on “All Souls: A Family Story from Southie”

    1. So many people told me I was going to love this book. Most of them were amazed that I had never read it, having taught at Boston Collegiate Charter School, which was founded in the late 90's as a response to the alarming death rate among Southie teens. Most of my Collegiate students were from Southie, and they had Southie pride, through and through. I think that, in many ways, we misunderstood each other -- and I did most of the misunderstanding. I had only an inkling of an idea why my students [...]

    2. I initially read this book when it came out, probably 10 years ago. After seeing the film Black Mass, I decided to listen to the audiobook. The book is very effectively narrated by the author. To hear this story in his voice, his soft Southie accent (an accent which is not always gentle), he tells the story of his family who survived (although several of his siblings did not) living in one of Southie's most notorious housing projects, Old Colony. This was a place that ambulances and fire trucks [...]

    3. It actually took me quite awhile to finish this book. Not because it was bad, but because the stark reality of it was something that I found so emotional that I found myself feeling a bit lost. He wrote so emotionally about his family, giving the reader a glimpse into a world that most of us have could never imagine. But I found that I was relating my own life to those events that Mr. MacDonald experienced. I remember the busing problems in South Boston and the evolution of our generation. The f [...]

    4. a sad, yet engrossing, memoir of a guy who grew up in southie (the poor irish neighborhood in south boston) during the busing riots of the 1970's. i've lived in the boston area for most of the past 6 1/2 years, but i really didn't know much about southie other than that it was poor, white, and not the best place to be after dark. one of the things i loved about this book was that it showed the community that exists behind and beyond that stereotype.what this book really showed me was how a well- [...]

    5. This book was a strange roller coaster. The first chapter had me riveted, then I slogged through subsequent chapters like a kid taking bitter medicine. I knew it was good for me but my soul felt like it had cramps. I learned a ton from this book about the complexities of the Southie identity, and the history of the busing movement in Boston, and the book's ending was fascinating (and redeeming). I cannot imagine having such a story to tell, and I appreciate that it has been told. However, having [...]

    6. This book made me realize that one of the reasons I like memoirs so much is that I enjoy reading about other people's lives and then being judgmental about all the things they are doing wrong. On the plus side, I liked the personal view on what was going on in urban Boston in the 1970s, especially the personal accounts of the busing riots. (I vaguely remember when that was in the news, and I was too young to quite get what it was all about.) The author is passionate about the neighborhood where [...]

    7. This book completely blew me away. I rarely give anything 5 stars but there was no question in this case. This is the true story of a poor white Irish-American family living in the projects in Southie. The writer was the 9th of 11 children and came of age during the seventies, right in the middle of busing and forced integration of housing projects. His story is unquestionably the most frightening story of urban poverty I've ever read, only in part because it's a true story. The fear this family [...]

    8. If you are a person that lives in an area like Jamaica plain, Southie, Dorchester or hyde park, this is a good book for you to read. This book is about how life was around those places a while ago. At first when you look at the books cover, you will think you will not like it because it as pictures of little kids and you might think its about the life of some little kids. But once you read it, you will like it because its about how life was in those places before before and if you lie reading bo [...]

    9. This was one of those books that you ought to read if you are from South Boston ("Southie") and that you should read if you are not from Southie. A touching memoir, at times sad, horrific, and even traumatizing but ultimately leaving the reader with hope for the future. I had to read this book for school so it was the first non-Chick Lit book I've read in a long while. As you mihgt imagine, what a change! It actually took me a little bit to get into this book; I think mostly because this book wa [...]

    10. A very gripping and powerful memoir about MacDonald's experiences growing up in the Southie neighborhood of Boston in the 1970's. The neighborhood was one of the poorest in the nation and was the home of the Irish Mob and the school-bussing riots. Definitely an eye-opener!

    11. "Even when we want to say their names, we sometimes get confused about who's dead and who's alive in my family." This sentence in the first paragraph hooked me.The MacDonald family is gloriously dysfunctional, brought up by a single mother whose wisdom is matched only by her wildness. But MacDonald leaves us no doubt that his guitar-playing, man-loving mother loves her children, against all the odds of poverty and violence and failed romance.This memoir is set in Southie, the community in Boston [...]

    12. It's a tough, mean story and not dissimilar to other public housing tales of large metropolis urban poor from my own experience in Marquette Park, Garfield Ridge, Ashburn areas of Chicago. And in nearly similar years, as well. It's told in a rather strange mood, IMHO, by Michael Patrick. But it does thoroughly grab your throat with the overall staggering loss and the ever present turmoil and chaos. It's his personal history. The story of his birth family- his Mother and 9 siblings. There is a ne [...]

    13. This is a gripping portrayal of a family living in the public housing projects of Boston, in the Irish neighborhood called Southie in the 1960s-1980s. Full of insight into the impact that poverty and violence has on the people in his life, Michael MacDonald paints a loving portrait of both his immediate family and his extended family, the community. Repeatedly describing his neighborhood as the best place on earth, he shines light into the corners of adversity and suffering. Drugs, gangs, and me [...]

    14. This book was extremely shocking and pretty disturbing. I love the author's style of narrative and I found myself almost loving Southie, myself. I laughed, I cried, I wanted to throw the book at the wall, and I gawked at the wall sometimes. The way the author just came out and said things exactly as they were was very insightful. I would recommend this book to those who think that the worst of the ghetto neighborhoods are predominantly African American. I now that Southie should be ranked up the [...]

    15. MacDonald, an exemplary storyteller, expertly weaves his passion for social justice into a narrative about his childhood in Southie, creating a believable, emotional memoir.

    16. An amazing account of family life in South Boston in the midst of violence, corruption, drugs, forced busing and more.

    17. This is the 3rd time I've read this. I love it: everytime I read it I get a little more fromIt.

    18. A powerful memoir of love and loss, strength and surrender. Apropos these timesMy view of Boston will never be the same again.

    19. I feel bad for Michael and his family, and anyone else that lived in Southie, one of the higher crime areas in the Boston in the 1960s. Especially, because seeing people trapped in a terrible environment, and unable to get out of, to break the vicious cycle. And each of the people in the story is actively contributing to the violent, full of drugs, toxic neighborhood, and still nothing can be done. Like fate had been sealed for such places (it is very sad how true that is). The simplest example [...]

    20. In his book “Black Rednecks and White Liberals,” Thomas Sowell explains how black ghetto culture is traceable to redneck culture in the South, which in turn is traceable to the Scotch-Irish peasantry which settled the region. In “All Souls,” Michael Patrick MacDonald’s sociologically important memoir of growing up in South Boston, we get a vivid look at the type of “Shanty Irish” culture that has more in common with Compton than it does Connecticut. The setting is a gritty cityscap [...]

    21. All Souls was a real eye-opener for me. I decided to read it because of Whitey Bulger's recent arrest, but I took much more from it than I expected to. I'm a somewhat new resident of Boston; I've been here for about six years. This book reminds me that you can live in a city for a long time- forever, maybe- and not genuinely know it. I'm not super familiar with Southie; I've been there a handful of times. I'm not even sure if the Southie described in this book still exists. Even the parts of All [...]

    22. I was born and raised in New England and I have heard at one point that Southie is pretty tough, but I never really cared enough to think about it. It was usually mentioned by guys that bragged about being from that area and I just don't find violence impressive. I think it is great that Michael MacDonald overcame so many obstacles to have found a positive role in such an ugly place. He's well educated and an activist for safety in Boston suburbs. While I'm all about anti violence I think people [...]

    23. Wow! All I did was look at the inside front cover. There's a list of the 11 kids, their dates of birth (9 btn 1956 and 1966, and 2 in 1975 and 1976), their dates of death (4 of them) and one period of coma This is going to be a hell of a story It was an incredible story told in a very credible voice. The death and loss was delivered to the reader more in the sense of a roll call than with great drama. But then, there was so much death and loss, I'm not sure any reader could take it if it were d [...]

    24. I have been dancing around this book for years, people recommended it to me or it was mentioned in conversations, I even recommended it to someone myself when we were talking about Black Mass, though I hadn't read it myself. The author's frank, unapologetic telling of his life's story is at times stark and horrifying but also a beautiful picture of the resilience and underlying ties that bind us all. White poverty is a taboo subject and as someone raised outside of Boston the other side of the b [...]

    25. Describes the life and times of the MacDonald family in the Old Colony section of South Boston. Ma MacDonald struggles to raise her large brood by living on Welfare, playing the accordion at night in local watering holes, and taking advantage of any opportunity to get more for less. It's a tough area and by the age of six the children have usually been at least one serious brawl to gain the respect of their peers. As they grow the kids learn to lie, steal and run scams at the same time they face [...]

    26. It was fascinating to see the world of Southie through the eyes of a young Boston Irish boy during the 70s and 80s. We've all heard of the race riots due to busing, but it was very compelling seeing the history not only through the eyes of someone who was there, but also through the eyes of a young, white boy. MacDonald writes well, and my only complaint might have been that a few of his stories felt like they built up well but ended without anything really happening; but one must remember that [...]

    27. From the busing riots, to the exploits of Whitey Bulger, to the every day scene of poverty and drugs, my eyes were opened to what life was really like in South Boston in the 60's,70's and 80's. The powerful influence of the Catholic Church and the Irish mob is chronicled along with the damaging effects of the "no snitch" culture of Southie. Although this story is filled with unbelievable tragedy, the author highlights joyful moments and in the end is hopeful for change. This is a great read for [...]

    28. I liked the story, though most of it was tragic. I did not care as much for the writing style. It just seemed like it ran on and on without any (or many) pivotal moments. There were pivotal points in the author's life, but I didn't feel he necessarily captured or reflected on them in his writing. An interesting book.

    29. One of the best memoirs I have ever read. So engaging, so raw! I have never read something so real. Very well written and very touching.

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