Subversive Southerner: Anne Braden and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Cold War South

Subversive Southerner Anne Braden and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Cold War South Oral History Association Book Award winner in Anne McCarty Braden is a southern white woman who made a dramatic break with her native segregationist culture in the years just following World War

  • Title: Subversive Southerner: Anne Braden and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Cold War South
  • Author: Catherine Fosl
  • ISBN: 9780312294878
  • Page: 490
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Oral History Association Book Award winner in 2003Anne McCarty Braden is a southern white woman who made a dramatic break with her native, segregationist culture in the years just following World War II to commit her life to the causes of racial and social justice One of the few white people, particularly from the South, to join the southern black freedom movement in its Oral History Association Book Award winner in 2003Anne McCarty Braden is a southern white woman who made a dramatic break with her native, segregationist culture in the years just following World War II to commit her life to the causes of racial and social justice One of the few white people, particularly from the South, to join the southern black freedom movement in its nascent years in the 1950s, Braden became a role model and inspiration for the thousands of young white people that joined the mass movement a decade later Braden stands nearly alone among other women of her race, class, region, and generation in her dedication to social change Born in 1924, Braden came of age after the women s rights and social reform crusades of the early part of the 20th century, and after the young activist women of the 1960s launched the civil rights, student, and women s liberation movements Yet Braden s life has intersected on some level with most of the great social movements of her lifetime, and represents a central link that connects the southern protest movements of the 1930s and 1940s to the mass civil rights movement of the 1960s.

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    One thought on “Subversive Southerner: Anne Braden and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Cold War South”

    1. i knew Anne Braden was a badass, butDAMN. ANNE BRADEN WAS A BADASS.Like how did you hang out with all my heroes? and then lesser heroes warned them not to hang out with you because you were too radical? but then they did anyway? and how did you understand intersectional feminism and the necessity of white anti-racist organizing like 40 years before the rest of America struggled to understand those things?Also, Louisville - YOU CRAZY. How you gonna have a KKK rally 10k deep on the eve of school b [...]

    2. This has long been one of my favorite biographies. Growing up in Louisville, KY where Anne Braden was a legend or a notorious character, depending on who was speaking of her, her story has always intrigued me. My first visit to The Civil Rights Museum in Memphis revealed to me that she was a major player in the civil rights struggle. Martin Luther King makes mention of Anne in his famous "Letter From Ther Birmingham Jail." My dearest friend from Louisville gave me a copy of Subversive Southerner [...]

    3. Fosl's bio of Anne Braden provides a unique and vital analysis of the southern civil rights movement through the experience of a white radical. Fosl ably employs her oral history interviews with Braden to enliven the story of the transition from the left labor radicalism of the 30s and 40s through the McCarthy period to the rise of the civil rights era and the new left. "Subversive Southerner" elevates Braden's role in the the struggle for justice and equality in the south by shedding new light [...]

    4. the only reason this didn't get five stars is because i find detailed biographies very tedious to read. i partially solved that by listening to it as an audiobook, but many times wished i had the passages in front of me to copy down or return to.i would definitely recommend this book to any white friends seeking to learn more about what their role might be in anti-racist/ racial justice pursuits. when coming to terms with our racist legacy and the life we enjoy at others' expense, many whites as [...]

    5. Anne Braden's name hit the headlines in 1954 when she and her husband, Carl, both white journalists in Louisville, Kentucky, bought a suburban home on behalf of Andrew and Charlotte Wade, an African American couple who were unable to buy the house themselves because of systematic discrimination in the housing market. After weeks of harassment upon moving into their new house, the Wade's home was partially destroyed by dynamite. The bombers were never brought to justice, but the Bradens, along wi [...]

    6. The BookA surprising portion of Subversive Southerner is dedicated to Anne's upbringing in the South. At first I felt it was bordering on too much, but as the book progressed I found that detailed background helpful in understanding Anne's motives, her relationship with her family, and her interactions with others.Anne's later life isn't explored nearly as in-depth, which is my only real complaint with the book. Fights for civil rights and civil liberties are still being fought and given that An [...]

    7. Amazing book. Amazing woman. Amazing life. I cannot believe I haven't read more about Anne Braden before now. 30 years an activist, and I knew virtually nothing about the connection between the anti-communist witchhunts and the prosegregationists in the south. To fight for civil rights was to be accused of being a communist, and Anne and Carl Braden spent their lives under the cloud of constant accusations. Rather than run from the pressure this put them under, they continued to organize for equ [...]

    8. This is a superb historical biography of one of my personal heroes, Anne Braden, written by Catherine Fosl. It follows the life of Anne McCarty Braden, a southerner born in Louisville, KY in 1924 and raised in Alabama. Anne realized at a young age the inequity in the social contract for African Americans, especially in the deep south. This realization caused her to change the trajectory of her life so she could fight for Social Justice in the American South. One of a handful of white women of he [...]

    9. Ann Braden grew up in the segregated south in a traditional white Alabama home but became one of the most radical white activists for racial justice in the South in the 1940's-2006 when she died. Catherine Fosl has done an incredible job of putting Braden's amazing journey and transformation into historical context. Braden came into her own, along with her husband Carl, during the rise of anti-Communist paranoia in the U.S. Fosl and Braden clearly illustrate how the charge of being a "Communist" [...]

    10. I honestly think I'm rating Braden herself as much as the book, but whatever: FIVE STARS FOR EVERYONE! Fosl's book covers a long, eventful life in a way that is consistently engaging, and she weaves together Braden's story with a broader examination of southern activism with impressive grace, only occasionally lapsing into what feels like unnecessary repetition. Braden's personal transformation -- from a child of southern privilege to a woman whose life was devoted to destroying the very system [...]

    11. The story of Anne Braden does a magnificent job of bridging that sometimes difficult connection between the Cold War and Civil Rights Movement in the South during the 1950s and early 1960s. Braden isn't a well-known figure from the era yet she's mentioned by name in MLK's Letter from a Birmingham Jail and the story of her and her husband, Carl, and their persecution during the Cold War and how it relates to Civil Rights challenges is a story that needs to be known.

    12. I haven't read this book for a few years, but I really liked it when I read it. During the Civil Rights Movement, Anne Braden was a white ally. She was also working to unite the Civil Liberties movement with the Civil Rights movement.

    13. Fosl writes an excellent biography of Louisville's own Anne Braden. I've heard the author speak and she was able to do interview with Braden. Fosl is now the director of the The Anne Braden Institute For Social Justice Research at the University of Louisville.

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