The Woman in Battle: The Civil War Narrative of Loreta Janeta Velazquez, Cuban Woman and Confederate Soldier

The Woman in Battle The Civil War Narrative of Loreta Janeta Velazquez Cuban Woman and Confederate Soldier A Cuban woman who moved to New Orleans in the s and eloped with her American lover Loreta Janeta Velazquez fought in the Civil War for the Confederacy as the cross dressing Harry T Buford As Bufo

  • Title: The Woman in Battle: The Civil War Narrative of Loreta Janeta Velazquez, Cuban Woman and Confederate Soldier
  • Author: Loreta Janeta Velázquez Jesse Alemán
  • ISBN: 9780299194246
  • Page: 113
  • Format: Paperback
  • A Cuban woman who moved to New Orleans in the 1850s and eloped with her American lover, Loreta Janeta Velazquez fought in the Civil War for the Confederacy as the cross dressing Harry T Buford As Buford, she single handedly organized an Arkansas regiment participated in the historic battles of Bull Run, Balls Bluff, Fort Donelson, and Shiloh romanced men and women andA Cuban woman who moved to New Orleans in the 1850s and eloped with her American lover, Loreta Janeta Velazquez fought in the Civil War for the Confederacy as the cross dressing Harry T Buford As Buford, she single handedly organized an Arkansas regiment participated in the historic battles of Bull Run, Balls Bluff, Fort Donelson, and Shiloh romanced men and women and eventually decided that spying as a woman better suited her Confederate cause than fighting as a man In the North, she posed as a double agent and worked to traffic information, drugs, and counterfeit bills to support the Confederate cause She was even hired by the Yankee secret service to find the woman traveling and figuring as a Confederate agent Velazquez herself.Originally published in 1876 as The Woman in Battle, this Civil War narrative offers Velazquez s seemingly impossible autobiographical account, as well as a new critical introduction and glossary by Jesse Alem n Scholars are divided between those who read the book as a generally honest autobiography and those who read it as mostly fiction According to Alem n s critical introduction, the book also reads as pulp fiction, spy memoir, seduction narrative, travel literature, and historical account, while it mirrors the literary conventions of other first person female accounts of cross dressing published in the United States during wartime, dating back to the Revolutionary War Whatever the facts are, this is an authentic Civil War narrative, Alem n concludes, that recounts how war disrupts normal gender roles, redefines national borders, and challenges the definition of identity.

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      Posted by:Loreta Janeta Velázquez Jesse Alemán
      Published :2018-012-10T15:02:48+00:00

    One thought on “The Woman in Battle: The Civil War Narrative of Loreta Janeta Velazquez, Cuban Woman and Confederate Soldier”

    1. I am very sad to learn she died penniless and branded a liar. Fortunately she was vindicated when a researcher found documents verifying she was paid as a spy for the Union.

    2. A Cuban woman who moved to New Orleans in the 1850s, Loreta Valazquez fought in the Civil War for the Confederacy as Harry T. Buford. As Buford, she organized an Arkansas regiment, participated in the battles of Blue Run, Balls Bluff, Fort Donelson and Shiloh.This seemingly impossible autobiographical account has been

    3. Loretta Valasquez was a Cuban woman that impersonated a soldier during the Civil War. She defied gender roles from a very young age, and she risked her life to prove that she could defend the nation alongside any man. This is her underappreciated memoir, and I would suggest it to history buffs and feminists. Quite an interesting read!

    4. "I'm Finished!" - finished enough, that is. This is a rich book and will deserve a second, more thorough read. I feel like you could analyze the entire center of the 19th century through this book alone.

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