Hall of Mirrors

Hall of Mirrors Rheinhardt a disk jockey and failed musician rolls into New Orleans looking for work and another chance in life What he finds is a woman physically and psychically damaged by the men in her past and

  • Title: Hall of Mirrors
  • Author: RobertStone
  • ISBN: 9780140098341
  • Page: 211
  • Format: Paperback
  • Rheinhardt, a disk jockey and failed musician, rolls into New Orleans looking for work and another chance in life What he finds is a woman physically and psychically damaged by the men in her past and a job that entangles him in a right wing political movement Peopled with civil rights activists, fanatical Christians, corrupt politicians, and demented Hollywood stars, ARheinhardt, a disk jockey and failed musician, rolls into New Orleans looking for work and another chance in life What he finds is a woman physically and psychically damaged by the men in her past and a job that entangles him in a right wing political movement Peopled with civil rights activists, fanatical Christians, corrupt politicians, and demented Hollywood stars, A Hall of Mirrors vividly depicts the dark side of America that erupted in the sixties To quote Wallace Stegner, Stone writes like a bird, like an angel, like a circus barker, like a con man, like someone so high on pot that he is scraping his shoes on the stars Robert Stone s first novel, A Hall of Mirrors, appeared in 1967 It won both a Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship, and a William Faulkner Foundation Award for best first novel.

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      Published :2018-08-07T22:12:39+00:00

    One thought on “Hall of Mirrors”

    1. I've been hearing for years about what a great writer Robert Stone is/was so I decided to read this, his first novel. I have to say that I was completely disappointed and underwhelmed. I'm not even sure about the three stars, but I'll leave it that way for now. There are three main characters, an alcoholic disc-jockey, a girl who's face was slashed with an oyster pick (I didn't know there was such a thing), and a guy who completes surveys with welfare recipients. All three of these people end up [...]

    2. Stone’s first novel is harrowing portrait of America on the utter edge of despair and destruction. This is surreal American poetry of unease; which has been compared to Lowry (the chemical addled rants and prophetic visions), Conrad (the “Hollow Men” Reinhardt and Sailor Farley), Nathaniel West (the deranged riot echoes the ending of Day of the Locust), and Chandler. Set in a Jim Crow era New Orleans (recast as a hell out of Bosch or Dante), but its unholy vision of conservative talk radio [...]

    3. It's just ridiculous for a first novel to be this good. Yes, it sometimes wanders off into purple Beatness (which was one of the things I loved when I first read it way back when, and less so now) but it's still so rich and earthy and funny, and even when the humor is mean, there's a compassion to it that Stone didn't always bring to his later books. Rheinhardt is the kind of smart bitter wastrel that Stone has written about a lot and he's very good at writing that kind of dialogue (I still crac [...]

    4. Θα σας μεταφερω την εμπειρια μου απο την ενασχοληση μου με το "κλασικο on the road μυθιστορημα" (οπως αυτοχαρακτηριζεται στο εξωφυλλο) "Η αιθουσα με τους καθρεφτες".Δυο κοινωνικα κατακαθια, ο αλκοολικος Ράινχαρτ και η καταρρακωμενη Τζεραλντίν,ψαχνοντας για δουλεια γνωριζονται μ [...]

    5. 3.5 stars. Compelling for its insightful portrait of extreme right-wing politics, showing the complex and sophisticated ways businessmen harness issues of welfare, race, patriotism, and religion to dupe an under-educated populace and magnify their hateful messages using talk radio. Written in 1964, this must have seemed brazenly cynical and paranoid at the time, but now it reads like a practical playbook for how things are done. There are brilliant set pieces full of dark comedy and the surreal [...]

    6. So crazy, so wild, gritty and fun. Highly recommended for all Stone fans or anyone who enjoys that nebulous sub genre called "literary thriller." The surprising thing about it is its year of publication, 1968. It's about a right wing, racist uprising in New Orleans, and damned if the dialog and various speeches don't seem to come straight out of yesterday's report from Fox News. Nothing has changed in this country, concerning race, for the last fifty years. This novel is proof of that.

    7. I like the idea of this novel but Robert stone doesn't carry it off. I read it several years ago but remember it as a weird cross Hemingway/Mailer's tough guy poses and Faulkner's southern decadence and meandering sentences. All his suggestive ambiguity which with Faulkner's best takes you someplace but at his worst seems a lot like "A Hall of Mirrors" I liked Stone's Dog Soldiers much better. The dialogue is funny and creepy and the characterizations seem spot on. Read that one instead.

    8. I'm glad I didn't read this one first. While Dog Soldiers and A Flag for Sunrise are two of my favorite books, Robert Stone's first novel shows how hard it is to write like Robert Stone. Very sloppy, very long and highly undeveloped, this treatise on activism in the 60's (or is it a limp satire on southern culture) was illegible at times. He tried so hard to make his main characters hippies and scammers and racists that pages would go by and the reader would have no idea what Stone was talking a [...]

    9. Robert Stone's "Hall of Mirrors" left a sour taste in my mouth. An on-the-scene look at the sinister side of right-wing politics, it presents the resurrection of Southern white supremacy in a jaded, deadpan manner that reads like Pynchonesque prose only feigning dark humor. His protagonist, a drunk clarinetist who becomes a proselytizing radio DJ without any conscience, is a two-bit imitation of a noir antihero while his girlfriend, a damaged blonde (of course), appears to be working with half a [...]

    10. There isn't a 4 1/2 stars, so I gave it five. The beginning is a little rocky, and I guess that's a sign that it is a first novel. There were a few parts throughout the book that were a little strange, and Robert Stone's experimentation is unusual.Still, the book is straightforward for the most part. It's sad. It's good.

    11. Hall of Mirrors is a surreal nightmare of. racism, political corruption, and troubled relationships in 1960s New Orleans.

    12. I remembered reading a story by Stone in college that felt right. I read it a few more times. Then I somehow forgot Stone's name when I wanted to read something else he'd written. Browsing in Browser Books recently his name appeared in my mind and I found the story in a collection next to this book on a shelf. A HALL OF MIRRORS will now sit next to THE MOVIEGOER by Percy, but I don't know exactly if it goes there. It has a different effect, it's flashier somehow. It's the 60's and you know it, b [...]

    13. The first time I read this I was pretty much blown away. A very subtle book. It took me to a time and place where I thought men wore white shirts and dark colored ties. Or it was right out in the open, the drunkards, the no account bums. No gray area. This book is complex what you see might not be what you get. Alcohol, drugs, corruption, racial tension. religious phonys lining their pockets , violence, straight arrows- hated by all, racial "power brokers". I think it would take anyone at least [...]

    14. "The California of the mind.'' Great laundromat scene. Prescient takes on right wing ravers and racial politics at their most extreme. Mr. Stone's first published novel and he's in fine form here. No one like him. And the ending is heartbreaking.

    15. Wonderful portrait of New Orleans and the entire Southern mood in the early 60s. A must-read for anyone who has been to New Orleans or wants a view of the civil rights turmoil that goes beyond the flashpoints in Selma and Montgomery.

    16. A vivid portrait of early 1960s New Orleans that also foresees the rise of right wing talk radio. Sharp descriptions of broken people.

    17. Started off promisingly, but I lost the thread later in the book. Interesting historically as a beat novel just before the sixties.

    18. I love Robert Stone, but this first novel gets a little too distracting toward the end when Stone loses control of his plot.

    19. wanted to read a new to e author. Don't remember where I got this title from. Very 1960's. Good writing. Would read him again.

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