Going to the Wars: The Experience of the British Civil Wars, 1638-1651

Going to the Wars The Experience of the British Civil Wars In the s thousands of young men in the British Isles set off to fight in the civil wars full of enthusiasm and commitment to the cause They were soon to be disillusioned Accustomed to a relative

  • Title: Going to the Wars: The Experience of the British Civil Wars, 1638-1651
  • Author: Charles Carlton
  • ISBN: 9780415103916
  • Page: 478
  • Format: Paperback
  • In the 1640s, thousands of young men in the British Isles set off to fight in the civil wars, full of enthusiasm and commitment to the cause They were soon to be disillusioned Accustomed to a relatively peaceful and secure way of life, the realities of battle the mental strain, physical exhaustion, loneliness and violence were devestating In Going to the Wars, CharlIn the 1640s, thousands of young men in the British Isles set off to fight in the civil wars, full of enthusiasm and commitment to the cause They were soon to be disillusioned Accustomed to a relatively peaceful and secure way of life, the realities of battle the mental strain, physical exhaustion, loneliness and violence were devestating In Going to the Wars, Charles Carlton studies the British civil wars from the perspective of those who fought them, to argue that the event described by G.M Trevelyan as the most important happening in our history, was also the most destructive.

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      Posted by:Charles Carlton
      Published :2019-03-15T17:51:23+00:00

    One thought on “Going to the Wars: The Experience of the British Civil Wars, 1638-1651”

    1. One of the best books I have ever read in any genre. This superb book explains the trials and tribulation of the peoples that had the misfortune to be caught up in the conflict. Be that the injured, the prisoners and even the children Carlton tells their story. How they survived, how they died, how they lived. Highly recommended.

    2. A lot of promise but Carlton has a nasty habit of trying to offend via swearing (why???) or making obtuse comments. Whilst I believe he has made good use of sources I found his reliance and blind faith in Lucy Hutchinson's memoirs worrying. His habit of rambling on or repeating or going back to topics was a little annoying but I would recommend this book though with caution and not for those new to the subject as this makes a poor foundation to build on

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