Making Headlines

Making Headlines As editor in chief of The Australian Chris Mitchell ran the largest stable of journalists with the largest editorial budget in the country for than twelve years This entertaining and deeply revealing

  • Title: Making Headlines
  • Author: Chris Mitchell
  • ISBN: 9780522870701
  • Page: 387
  • Format: Paperback
  • As editor in chief of The Australian, Chris Mitchell ran the largest stable of journalists with the largest editorial budget in the country for than twelve years This entertaining and deeply revealing book offers readers riveting insights into the quirks and foibles of some of the most powerful politicians and media executives this country has produced.A controversiaAs editor in chief of The Australian, Chris Mitchell ran the largest stable of journalists with the largest editorial budget in the country for than twelve years This entertaining and deeply revealing book offers readers riveting insights into the quirks and foibles of some of the most powerful politicians and media executives this country has produced.A controversial figure throughout his quarter of a century as a daily editor, Chris Mitchell still maintains close regular contact with past prime ministers, editors and media CEOs Making Headlines highlights the judgements and thinking that govern daily newspaper journalism at the highest level and the battles fought to publish tough stories about the rich and the powerful, the disenfranchised and the powerless.Making Headlines is compulsory reading for citizens who care, the political class inside the beltway and beyond, and wannabe journalists in search of a job.

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      Published :2019-01-14T05:03:45+00:00

    One thought on “Making Headlines”

    1. I hope the author of this book, Chris Mitchell, doesn't mind me plagiarising one of his ideas.He opens his acknowledgements with: "I would like to thank my four children, my ex-wives and my beautiful wife Cathy for supporting "I don't know how many former wives he's talking about? Has he accumulated as many ex-wives as his boss, Rupert Murdoch, for instance? Maybe it's a News Limited thing. All I know is the main comic character of my new novel, Major B.S. has had way more kids and has probably [...]

    2. (EFA) As editor-in-chief of The Australian Chris Mitchell ran into the ground this intellectually limited mouth piece owned by a US plutocrat. A loss making publication it has failed to make a cent even with the largest editorial budget in the country for more than twelve years. This complete fantasy, deeply reveals to the white mono cultured male over 55 reader who will read this drivel without thought, hardly anything insightful into the quirks and foibles of some of the most powerful politici [...]

    3. GrandioseSelf-opinionated; that's autobiography! Found this to be a one-sided rant about the rightist approach of The Oz and the failures of Aunty ABC. Not what I would describe as reflective or a contemplation about standards of journalism in Australia. Not quite "fake news"

    4. Without a doubt The Australian is a quality broadsheet, and so it should be, having the largest editorial budget and largest stable of journalist of any newspaper in Australia. Unfortunately Mitchell’s memoir of his time as editor of The Australian has a similar tone as the newspaper itself. Continued expressions of superiority, righteousness, bitchy comments and an ever-lasting justification of every thing he did. If Mitchell ever made a serious mistake in his professional life you will not f [...]

    5. Newspapers are essential for lining the bottom of our bird's cage.I can tell you right now that journalists are not my favourite people and I feel far less depressed these days because I stopped reading newspapers years ago. So when a friend gave me a copy of Making Headlines, I was not jumping out of my skin to read iteven if it was written by the editor of Australia’s foremost newspaper.According to Chris Mitchell, politics, my least favourite subject, is almost all that newspaper editors li [...]

    6. I am no fan of Murdoch newspapers but wanted to read this book to better understand their internal workings. Many people believe that Rupert has his hands on the day-to-day issues his papers editorialise, but it is much simpler than that. He simply employs editors like Mitchell who share his libertarian, free market world view and then leaves it largely to them.Chris Mitchell, like Rupert, believes an editor has a right, even responsibility, to steer the political discourse, and outcomes if poss [...]

    7. Hmmm, riveting in parts, but dragged badly in others. Worked in that environment for a number of years so enough to pique my interest but not sure of its mass appeal.

    8. An interesting read, although fascinating that a man who has spent his whole working life editing and directing other people’s writing writes without much flair. It is the subject matter that kept me going, not the prose. It is also not an autobiography, it offers almost no insight into the man, only his work. Maybe to be expected as he seems to have been completely consumed by it.Chris Mitchell was no doubt very, very good at what he did. As editor of The Australian he would have had to be go [...]

    9. I enjoyed this book, though parts of it are very boring and will no doubt be of interest only to those whose business is media. I think The Australian is the only serious newspaper in Australia, and Chris Mitchell was in charge there for a long time. His paper shaped and contributed to many national debates and so this book is required reading for Australian intellectuals and decision-makers.Of interest is how Mitchell guided his paper to campaign on various topics the papers really do make head [...]

    10. I found the author's constant self aggrandising attitude somewhat irritating, but nevertheless there is a lot of political detail and gossip, such that if you're into Australian politics, it is well worth a read. The author is extremely hypocritical. After his pilloring of journalist Michael Brissenden and others over their having revealed a conversation with Peter Costello, the author does exactly that with his conversations with various Prime Ministers. Obviously written from a conservative vi [...]

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