The Imperial Presidency

The Imperial Presidency From two time Pulitzer Prize winning historian Arthur M Schlesinger Jr comes one of the most important and influential investigations of the American presidency The Imperial Presidency traces the gro

  • Title: The Imperial Presidency
  • Author: Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.
  • ISBN: 9780618420018
  • Page: 398
  • Format: Paperback
  • From two time Pulitzer Prize winning historian Arthur M Schlesinger, Jr comes one of the most important and influential investigations of the American presidency The Imperial Presidency traces the growth of presidential power over two centuries, from George Washington to George W Bush, examining how it has both served and harmed the Constitution and what Americans canFrom two time Pulitzer Prize winning historian Arthur M Schlesinger, Jr comes one of the most important and influential investigations of the American presidency The Imperial Presidency traces the growth of presidential power over two centuries, from George Washington to George W Bush, examining how it has both served and harmed the Constitution and what Americans can do about it in years to come The book that gave the phrase imperial presidency to the language, this is a work of substantial scholarship written with lucidity, charm, and wit The New Yorker.

    • [PDF] ñ Unlimited ✓ The Imperial Presidency : by Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. à
      398 Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ñ Unlimited ✓ The Imperial Presidency : by Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. à
      Posted by:Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.
      Published :2019-01-25T04:55:33+00:00

    One thought on “The Imperial Presidency”

    1. An extremely interesting history of the evolution of the relative power and influence of the executive branch of the American government. Written shortly after the Nixon administration, and the book views it not as an aberration, but as a culmination of executive power, which has continued to expand beyond its original constitutional grounds.Links accumulation of powers of foreign policy during war time (Civil War, WWI, WWII, Korea, and finally Vietnam) to later accumulation of domestic power - [...]

    2. I read Charlie Savage's Takeover: The Return of the Imperial Presidency some years ago, which referred to this, and thought I should read it. This book is not necessary for the other one, though it has its own points and its own weaknesses.Maybe weakness is the wrong word. The first chapters are about legal history and constitutional law, and this is true with other authors too, but reading that is a long and difficult slog. i can't say that it is boring, because interesting information comes ou [...]

    3. While I think it was a bit more of a straightforward anti-Nixon rag rather than a broader analytic/historical view of executive power, I thought it was excellent.

    4. هذا الكتاب من امهات الكتب في الفقه السياسي للرءىاسة الأميركية وتاريخها. وموءلف الكتاب صاحب فكر سياسي ثاقب رحمه الله.

    5. The Imperial Presidency is great reading for anyone seeking to understand the debates over presidential power & democratic accountability and how we reached the present status. Schlesinger Jr. is a compelling writer who speaks from personal experience and his own friendship with JFK.Schlesinger begins by outlining what was created at the Constitutional Convention--rejection of the Hamilton Plan and placement of foreign policy in the hands of the Congress. Then he develops how that framework [...]

    6. In this dense and somewhat thorough book, Arthur Schlesinger takes us through the manifestation of a very important phenomenon in American politics: the Imperial Presidency. Namely, one that acquires more and more power as the years go by.Although I was unable to absorb all the points presented in this book, there is a certain pattern that emerges from studying the course of the presidency in the United States since its inception, and this is that presidents are unhappy with the limitation of th [...]

    7. Schlesinger starts this book out by examining the history of the office of Presidency: how it was set up, the arguments that the Founders had about it, and how those arguments shaped the compromises that comprise the office. He then goes into how the powers of the office grew over time - gradually at first, then exponentially once FDR came into office. Ironically, Schlesinger credits him with not abusing the office as several later Presidents did. But, as Schlesinger points out, FDR's expansion [...]

    8. The first half or so of this important tome is a fascinating trek through a series of administrations and the highs and lows of presidential power and control. The second half is dedicated, for the most part, to a critique of Richard Nixon and his usurpation of powers normally delegated to - or carried out in conjunction with - the Congress and the courts. As the book came out in 1973, it is dated insofar as it predates Nixon's resignation the year after as well as the passing of the War Powers [...]

    9. Arthur Schlesinger's "The Imperial Presidency" is one of the best books I've read in a long time. It's an incisive and critical look at the American Presidency. It was published during the Nixon administration and then fell out of favor during the decades that followed. The dramatic expansion of executive power during the Bush years has made it seem both relevant and prophetic again.

    10. This was assigned for a political science class, but I found myself reading it outside the parameters of the class because it was so fascinating. An in-depth look at how the balance of power has changed between the legislative and executive branches of government since the ratification of the Constitution.

    11. Schlesinger works out his penitence to Edwin Corwin and unleashes his rhetoric on Nixon. I say this not in defense of Nixon, but that without him, Schlesinger's thesis lacks force. It is an important read, but the thesis is far from sound.

    12. This was a real eye-opener for me, even if I wasn't in love with the writing. Dry, sometimes too legalistic, but overall very informative. A must read for anyone who cares at all about the state of the presidency in America.

    13. Brilliantly distilled "classic" view of executive power. Penned in obvious response to Nixon Presidency. . . one wonders what Schlesinger would say of the Obama/Bush/Clinton executive model.

    14. Mr. Schlesinger's antipathy for President Nixon is well-founded; his apparent distaste for his editor less so.

    15. If you can call Schlesinger a "historian," he gives a good historical perspective at the American presidency. I just haven't gotten through most of it yet.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *