Trigger Happy: Videogames and the Entertainment Revolution

Trigger Happy Videogames and the Entertainment Revolution The Edge calls Trigger Happy a seminal piece of work For the first time ever an aficionado with a knowledge of art culture and a real love of gaming takes a critical look at the future of our video

  • Title: Trigger Happy: Videogames and the Entertainment Revolution
  • Author: Steven Poole
  • ISBN: 9781559705981
  • Page: 466
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Edge calls Trigger Happy a seminal piece of work For the first time ever, an aficionado with a knowledge of art, culture, and a real love of gaming takes a critical look at the future of our videogames, and compares their aesthetic and economic impact on society to that of film Thirty years after the invention of the simplest of games, videogames are played byThe Edge calls Trigger Happy a seminal piece of work For the first time ever, an aficionado with a knowledge of art, culture, and a real love of gaming takes a critical look at the future of our videogames, and compares their aesthetic and economic impact on society to that of film Thirty years after the invention of the simplest of games, videogames are played by adults than children This revolutionary book is the first ever academically worthy and deeply engaging critique of one of today s most popular forms of play videogames are on track to supersede movies as the most innovative form of entertainment in the new century.

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      Published :2018-08-02T22:02:48+00:00

    One thought on “Trigger Happy: Videogames and the Entertainment Revolution”

    1. This is a passionate and very English (and a decade old) cri de coeur for games to rise above their shortcomings and triumph as a platform for aesthetic wonder and transcendent magic! Yeah! Come on games! Has that happened? A decade on from 2001, that is? Umm . . . no. Not especially, though there are enough truly great games to contest this. Don’t look at me, I’m an observer, I am the horny fact collector.The text is very flighty and academic: the author being a Cambridge lit graduate and G [...]

    2. Very interesting book, worth reading for anyone who's interested in the history of video games. This is effectively a time capsule, having been written back in 2000 (although this is a revised edition from 2004). It's said to be one of the first books that ever looked at video games as art, and the author spends the whole book defending this opinion with many examples and parallels to other art forms; this is a point of view I *really* agree with, so of course I enjoyed the argumentation.Let's d [...]

    3. Read way back when; it is definitely showing its age now but it is still an interesting time capsule. A very easy and enjoyable read that is easy to follow and full of history for those dipping their toes for the first time.

    4. This has been on many lists of 'essential video game books,' so as an avid video gamer, I felt like this was a must-read for me. Unfortunately, reading in 2017, it fell flat, in the way that a lot of books about cutting-edge technology do when not read shortly after publication. It's an interesting historical document that I feel I would have enjoyed a lot more if I read it when it was published.It's not you, Trigger Happy, it's me.

    5. A look at video games as an art form, with discussions on how similar and different they are from other forms of art. Interesting, especially for the historical discussion of the medium, but also handicapped by age - Poole spends a lot of time talking about Tomb Raider II, for example, and I honestly can't remember the last time I played that game or any details about it. Due to the age, a lot of the discussion becomes obselete: games like Rock Band, World of Warcraft, and the modern incarnation [...]

    6. Steven Poole has made a good attempt at taking a more scientific and academic look at video games and their evolution over the last 30 years or so. I wasn't expecting the book to be as analytical as it was, but it turned out to be a good thing. I think he did a great job of attempting to analyze the industry for multiple viewpoints and zeroing in on particular psychological and sociology ideas. At times this book can start to get a little too close to the border between entertainment and philoso [...]

    7. (While reading Trigger Happy: Videogames and the Entertainment Revolution, my spouse wondered if videogames are a relevant academic topic. During my explanation as to "Yes, they are," I discovered that the author, Steven Poole, wrote a more recent book I purchased for the library, called Unspeak, which is pretty scholarly in itself. This isn't supremely relevant to this review, but highly coincidental.) Anyway, the ideal reader for this book is most certainly one who plays and enjoys video games [...]

    8. Another video game book for my paper. This is pretty old, written in 2000, which is ancient for game theory. There have been tons of huge changes in the scene since he wrote this. All that aside though, I personally don't agree with some of his theory. He focuses a lot on games as an imaginary world which exists inextricable to time, but doesn't at all discuss the process of detachment or identification with an avatar. I find it difficult to discuss video games academically if I'm not bringing u [...]

    9. Steven Poole is an excellent writer and I've been burning through this book rather quickly. It's entertaining mind-snap back to a time when I was a fringe gamer and not a serious geek in the sense that I knew the games were there, I just didn't have the time to play them (or was into just one so intensely that I didn't have time for the others). So Poole takes me into the guts of the games and explains very well how they evolved into the games we have today. Pity, we don't have an updated versio [...]

    10. it's amazing how just 10 years have made a lot of what this book does irrelevant, but that is the case . . and i wasn't sure what the overall project of the book was . . . lots of it just seemed like riffing on different aspects of games, etc. . . that being said, it did have some good points and good overall reflections on games, differences between them and other media, their implications as far as why they're popular, what their future might hold, etc. . . in general, with such an evolving fo [...]

    11. An intriguing, scholarly, and comprehensive study of the state of the art in videogames circa 2001; the author highlights an extensive range of links to culture, the arts, and human thought over the ages and now. This book will forever shatter any ideas the reader may have had of videogames being a simplistic or shallow form of entertainment and opens doors to some exciting possibilities for future developments and uses of the form.

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