Junk DNA: A Journey Through the Dark Matter of the Genome

Junk DNA A Journey Through the Dark Matter of the Genome From the author of the acclaimed The Epigenetics Revolution A book that would have had Darwin swooning Guardian comes another thrilling exploration of the cutting edge of human science For decades aft

  • Title: Junk DNA: A Journey Through the Dark Matter of the Genome
  • Author: Nessa Carey
  • ISBN: 9781848319158
  • Page: 239
  • Format: Paperback
  • From the author of the acclaimed The Epigenetics Revolution A book that would have had Darwin swooning Guardian comes another thrilling exploration of the cutting edge of human science For decades after the structure of DNA was identified, scientists focused purely on genes, the regions of the genome that contain codes for the production of proteins Other regions From the author of the acclaimed The Epigenetics Revolution A book that would have had Darwin swooning Guardian comes another thrilling exploration of the cutting edge of human science For decades after the structure of DNA was identified, scientists focused purely on genes, the regions of the genome that contain codes for the production of proteins Other regions 98% of the human genome were dismissed as junk But in recent years researchers have discovered that variations in this junk DNA underlie many previously intractable diseases, and they can now generate new approaches to tackling them Nessa Carey explores, for the first time for a general audience, the incredible story behind a controversy that has generated unusually vituperative public exchanges between scientists She shows how junk DNA plays an important role in areas as diverse as genetic diseases, viral infections, sex determination in mammals, human biological complexity, disease treatments, even evolution itself and reveals how we are only now truly unlocking its secrets, than half a century after Crick and Watson won their Nobel prize for the discovery of the structure of DNA in 1962.

    • Free Download [Cookbooks Book] ☆ Junk DNA: A Journey Through the Dark Matter of the Genome - by Nessa Carey ✓
      239 Nessa Carey
    • thumbnail Title: Free Download [Cookbooks Book] ☆ Junk DNA: A Journey Through the Dark Matter of the Genome - by Nessa Carey ✓
      Posted by:Nessa Carey
      Published :2018-01-06T19:02:22+00:00

    One thought on “Junk DNA: A Journey Through the Dark Matter of the Genome”

    1. Maybe a third of Junk DNA overlaps with the contents of Carey's previous book, The Epigenetics Revolution. This was most likely obvious to me because I read them so closely together. The overlap is not a bad thing at all, but it made me notice that even though Junk DNA is more readable because Carey discards references to gene names and other very technical nomenclature, I actually preferred the approaches to explaining experiments and processes in the Epigenetics Revolution. Sometimes I really [...]

    2. A self-explanatory title, but not quite: the object of this book is to reveal the many ways in which so called “junk” DNA is nothing of the sort. About 98% of human DNA does not code for protein production, and this has traditionally been assigned the status of junk. But there are many ways in which such DNA can be involved in crucial ways to the healthy functioning of cells. The author takes as balanced a view as possible of issues causing controversy among the specialists, neither attribut [...]

    3. I’ve read Nessa Carey’s work before, in The Epigenetics Revolution, so I had high hopes for this — especially because it involves a lot more discussion of epigenetic modification of gene expression, and because genetics in general is something that fascinates me. If this is an interest of yours, then this will definitely work for you; I didn’t feel like it repeated the basics too much, but at the same time, it was perfectly readable for anyone at a lower level. I think so, anyway; it’s [...]

    4. Great examination of just what "junk" DNA can do. When humans don't understand something, they often label it in such a way to suggest it does not matter. Labeling the non-coding portion of DNA as "junk" is just such a case. Carey provides the reader with myriad evidence about the wonderful role junk plays in helping cells and larger organisms, such as humans, function. Junk regulates DNA in many ways that are helpful and some ways that are not so helpful. Carey gives a pretty thorough survey of [...]

    5. Junk DNA: A Journey Through the Dark Matter of the Genomediscusses the uses and functions of the 98% of DNA that doesn't code for a specific protein (i.e. "Junk DNA"). The topics covered in this book include retrogenes, DNA/RNA repeats, protein sequences, non-protein coding RNAs, telomeres, enhancers, promoters, epigenetics, 3D interatctions, splicing, insulators, centromeres and examples of the various diseases and disorders that can occur when "junk DNA/RNA doesn't function properly. The infor [...]

    6. Really interesting, and at times quite funny. Long and short non-coding DNA, epigenetics, splicing fascinating! The complexity of our genetics is almost incomprehensible (genes regulated by promoters and inhibitors, regulated by many different types of long non-coding DNA, regulated by epigenetics, mediated by short non-coding DNA, ). It is a wonder we are alive.Protein splicing reminds me of data compression. The cell has learned to store patterns/recipes to create proteins instead of coding [...]

    7. At last, this day has come! It has been a long journey indeedReasons why I loved this book:1. The biology was interesting, to say the least. A reminder that biology is worth more than the tedious syllabus that A-Level provides.2. It was comprehensive, accessible, translating some complex features of the human genome into Standard English. It was also fun to see the writings of a scientist that actually seemed to relate to the wider reader and whose writing style was not as pompously attached to [...]

    8. Like the other book that she has written (on epigenetics), this is not an easy read. Before reading this book, it is even better to have read the book she wrote on epigenetics. This since this book on junk DNA makes use of concepts that are explained very well in her epigenetics book.Due to the relative complex subject matter in this book, I again read only one or two chapters a day. This since it allowed me to ‘digest’ the topic at hand. Like her book on epigenetics, this book on junk DNA d [...]

    9. Vindicated! When I took a Genetics course in the late 1980's, it bothered me that the non-protein coding parts of DNA were described as not having a role. It seemed to me it would be better to say whether they have a role was not known. Carey has written a very readable account of what has been learned.

    10. 98% of the human DNA does not code for protein. The book delves into different parts of that "junk" DNA. What does it do? Why it is there? Can we do without it? How does it interact with other parts of the DNA? Possible application in medicine?In the end I emerged with greater knowledge and appreciation for the whole DNA machinery.

    11. What grabs the reader fairly early on in Junk DNA is just how wonderfully complex and sophisticated the biological machinery in our cells is. As a non-biologist, I found that reading her description of the way that the cellular mechanisms pull the two copies of a chromosome to opposite sides of the cell, for instance, absolutely riveting. But it's not all superbly functioning miniature marvels: Nessa Carey also explores the many ways that these genetic mechanisms can go wrong. Anyone who ascribe [...]

    12. I found this book difficult to understand, probably because the workings of the DNA and RNA are not well understood. One genetic disease after another, GTC vs GCGC, and all that. Mutations and deformed children. The astounding complexity of DNA and biological systems. Seriously, how do these molecules know how to do all this stuff? And yet the idea of evolution is still touted, by the author Nessa Carey, as the source of all this incredible complexity. I mean if you are able to step back from th [...]

    13. I liked this book, though I enjoyed the Epigenetic Revolution much better. This one is along the same lines, but it gets pretty technical. I had to start and stop a lot. Still, I'm a fan of the author's explanatory prose and unlike another reader here I did mostly appreciate the analogies. I wonder if this book would have read better if they opened it up with a narrative about a case study involving the chapter's topic rather than sticking it in after the explanation or between them. I mostly ap [...]

    14. Nessa Carey is one of my favourite science writers. Her ability to transmit complex ideas via brilliant analogies is second to none.Following on from her previous book, *The Epigenetics Revolution*, Carey now plunges us into the dark matter of the human genome, Junk DNA; the 98 percent of the human genome which doesn't code for proteins. However, all isn't as it first appears, as we shouldn't be quick to write-off as junk what is actually biological treasure.This book is fascinating and insightf [...]

    15. Carey has the makings of a good science writer, and I mostly enjoyed her first book (Epigenetics). I looked forward to reading this one too: her exploration of the non-protein-encoding parts of our DNA.It started well. But at some point in Chapter 10, I realised I wasn't on top of things. A little while later, I started from the beginning again. But I got lost at roughly the same point again. And though I persevered to the end, it was a struggle and the pleasures were few and far between.I suspe [...]

    16. 3.5* More of a slog compared to The Epigenetics Revolution, but perhaps inevitable because of the jump in technical difficulty? Some analogies were charming and witty as expected of Nessa Carey, others forced and overly reliant on scare-quotes and speculation and Star Trek references (am not a Trekkie, was baffled). Rounding up because I did learn plenty, and she recommends shiny things in footnotes (the Lego Movie IS awesome).

    17. I wanted to like this, I really did. But after weeks of struggling through it, I'm going to just put it aside for a while. There's two problems. First, presenting stories from a complex and technical world to outsiders is a tricky art form, and this one drowns in numbing detail and derails with awkward analogies. Second, every few chapters, there's something REALLY INTERESTING that I'm looking forward to trotting out at some dinner party somewhere.

    18. This book is undoubtedly of extreme interest. In this book Nessa keeps the terminology somewhat simple making this feel like a light informative novel rather than what some may suggest as a stuffy science read. It was a pleasure to see someone using the term junk DNA in a respectful, interesting and informative manner, will be keeping my eyes out for next book :)

    19. A very good introduction on the functions of "junk" DNA, the non-protein coding regions of our DNA. Despite the very complex subject, the book is easy to read even for readers with minimal background information on the topic. There are some good analogies but others feel forced and don't really make the problem easier to grasp.

    20. Leaving the hard core genetics and molecular biology field in favor for computer science, I was nearly forgotten how fascinating the living cell can be. Carey sketches the clockwork of living beings, painting the proteins as merely the dumb muscle and DNA and RNA the true main actors.

    21. I read chapters 1, 3, 5, 10 and 12 of this book.This book is great because it explains genetics in plain English. It isn't intimidating at all. It has a nice sense of humor and I learned quite a bit in my ~hour of skimming.

    22. The author tries to compare the topics with obscure movie trivia and often tries to add humour that really isn't funny. I can just imagine him laughing at his own jokes while writing without any thought to the reader.

    23. Very good review of the many varied functions of non-protein DNA. Complex, but well described examples of how this DNA can or may function.

    24. Interesting, definitely not a light read, and definitely not going to rock your world, butting.

    25. exceptional book. eventhough name is junk dna, as we move through all aspects regarding dna metabolism is well said.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *