Civility: Manners, Morals, And The Etiquette Of Democracy

Civility Manners Morals And The Etiquette Of Democracy In this followup to Integrity Yale law professor Stephen Carter continues to meditate upon the prepolitical qualities on which a healthy society is based Why do people show poorer manners today than

  • Title: Civility: Manners, Morals, And The Etiquette Of Democracy
  • Author: Stephen L. Carter
  • ISBN: 9780465023844
  • Page: 413
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In this followup to Integrity, Yale law professor Stephen Carter continues to meditate upon the prepolitical qualities on which a healthy society is based.Why do people show poorer manners today than in previous ages How did we come to confuse rudeness with self expression and acting on our rights Carter looks at these and other important questions with a combinationIn this followup to Integrity, Yale law professor Stephen Carter continues to meditate upon the prepolitical qualities on which a healthy society is based.Why do people show poorer manners today than in previous ages How did we come to confuse rudeness with self expression and acting on our rights Carter looks at these and other important questions with a combination of his personal experiences and an extremely long shelf of reading material, all the while maintaining an informal writing style that continually but politely engages the reader, inviting him or her to think about these issues along with Carter.There are important messages here about generosity and trust, about respecting diversity and dissent, and about resolving conflict through dialogue rather than mandate Stephen Carter would never be so uncivil as to demand your attention, but Civility most definitely compels.

    Civility Manners, Morals, and the Etiquette of Democracy Basic good manners have become a casualty of our postmodern culture Yale law professor and social critic Stephen L Carter argues that civility is disintegrating because we have forgotten the obligations we owe to each other, and are awash instead in a sea of self indulgence. Civility Manners, Morals, and the Etiquette of Democracy Civility, in other words, encompa But it did strike me as a clear, succinct, and insightful summary of some of the most important habits of citizenship that people in the United States have never been very good at and that we seem to be getting worse at all the time. Civility Manners, Morals, And The Etiquette Of Democracy Civility Manners Morals And The Etiquette Of Democracy In this followup to Integrity Yale law professor Stephen Carter continues to meditate upon the prepolitical qualities on which a healthy society is based Why do people show poorer manners today than. Civility Manners, Morals, and the Etiquette of Democracy Civility Manners, Morals, and the Etiquette of Democracy out of based on ratings reviews. Gediman Reviews Carter s Civility Manners, Morals Civility Manners, Morals, and the Etiquette of Democracy Stephen L Carter In his preface, Carter, a law professor at Yale, writes that Civility is the second book, after on Railroads, Carter appears intent on fulfilling a reader s worst fears of being subjected to a moral primer on manners Indeed, Civility is filled with starchy Civility Manners, Morals, and the Etiquette of Democracy Civility This book is not a book of etiquette It is an historical review, leading to how personal behavior affects our society It is not a feel good book about success or personal growth. Customer reviews Civility Manners, Morals Discussion of his book led me to Civility I find there grounds for hope that is so difficult in these days of a public discourse that includes assumptions that good people can be Review of Stephen Carter s Civility Manners, Morals, and REVIEW of CIVILITY Manners, Morals, and the Etiquette of Democracy and THE DISSENT OF THE GOVERNED A Meditation on Law, Religion, and Loyalty By Stephen L Carter Michael Lind, NY Times Book Review When Is Civility a Duty, and When Is It a Trap The Nov , The civility of manners is a set of conventions that allows us, according to the philosopher Cheshire Calhoun, to communicate basic moral attitudes of respect, tolerance and considerateness. Civility Critical Essays eNotes May , Civility, in Carter s view, is not synonymous with manners or etiquette, although it invariably involves these, but it is a much deeper commitment to respect or even love fellow citizens in a

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    One thought on “Civility: Manners, Morals, And The Etiquette Of Democracy”

    1. Nothing in Stephen Carter's Civility struck me with the force of revelation. But it did strike me as a clear, succinct, and insightful summary of some of the most important habits of citizenship that people in the United States have never been very good at and that we seem to be getting worse at all the time. Carter starts with a clear and valuable definition of "civility" as "the sum of the many sacrifices we are called to make for the sake of living together." Civility, in other words, encompa [...]

    2. It's a mixed bag, but it's absolutely fascinating to read now, twenty-odd years after it was written. I couldn't help thinking, over and over again, "Wow, if he was this upset about the state of civility in politics in the '90s, what must he be thinking now? This poor man." Not generally the way one thinks of bestselling authors/Yale law professors.I liked his overall idea—civility is a form of sacrifice, as we give up the pleasure of indulging our urges in exchange for civilized relationships [...]

    3. First read: the single best book I've read this year.Very inspiring take on our society's urgent need for civility from anintelligent and articulate law professor. I highly recommend this book. (Yes! Believe it or not, a book on civility written by a lawyer! LOL) And that snide, side comment, Carter might say, is the very type of thing that undermines our world. Sorry. Apologies to all lawyers. No more sarcasm. No more cynicism.

    4. In the era of modern, instant and incessant telecommunications, it has become all too commonplace to grandstand, villify, and simply outshout one's opponents. Dialog and compromise seem so weak, even defeatist. It need not be so. Carter is that rare writer whose appeal not only to civility but to morality strikes one as a rallying cry, and never comes off as preachy. If only all aspiring politicians would take his words and those of writers like Jim Wallis to heart

    5. Civility is needed in our society now more than ever and Carter's thoughts on the subject, although now 20 years old, are just as relevant today. Recommended reading for anyone who thinks we need a more civil society.

    6. Thoughtful and exemplifies well what a "faith informed" perspective on public life that takes evangelical Christian faith seriously but without the triumphalism, heavy-handedness, or lack of respect for difference that marks the public stereotype of evangelicals that speak on public and political matters. Secular progressives and religious conservatives I'm guessing will be tempted to find fault and dismiss Carter's arguments too quickly, but for the most part I think that says more about their [...]

    7. I had low expectations for this book but have been very pleasantly surprised. I don't understand why some reviewers are rating it so low. Thus far I would recommend it not just to some but to all. I'm not reading it lineararly, which may be why I like it more than some other people do. Good spoiler alert: He relies heavily on an 1815 sermon about loving one's neighbor & what that does & doesn't mean in a would-be civil society (or civil people in any society). I found his chapters on thi [...]

    8. This book is an analysis of what has happened to civility in the U.S why it matters, and what can be done about it. Carter believes that civility is a a moral issue but tries to balance the discussion between philosophy and theology, with examples drawn from law, politics, and everyday life. He begins by making the observation that civility calls on us "to sacrifice for others as we travel through life that this makes the ride tolerable." "We care less and less about our fellow citizens because [...]

    9. Written in the late 1990's the book holds up well as a description of political and social dysfunction, but his remedies -- basically a return to religious and moral training of children -- seem unlikely to be applied. Reading it is still worthwhile for a self-inventory as well as to discover Carter's unusual constellation of values and enjoy his legal/logical reasoning, even when it is very selectively applied. It was not as compelling, to me, as The Culture of Disbelief.

    10. Carter makes salient points about the need for civility, but it is often obfuscated under a supposedly informal style of writing. I had to take numerous breaks while reading this, not to absorb his points (which he reiterates once too often), but to stay awake. If you can get past his writing, you may find something with which to agree or disagree with civility.

    11. The "Rules" that Stephen Carter wrote about in this book at first seemed like a great concept, but it was followed by points that were not backed up with any sort of a valid argument. I found the author to be very hypocritical, by portraying the complete opposite of "civility" in which the title suggests. Would not recommend.

    12. Very interesting examination of what it means to be civilized and how our culture is losing this characteristic.

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