Teaching the Trees: Lessons from the Forest

Teaching the Trees Lessons from the Forest In this collection of natural history essays biologist Joan Maloof embarks on a series of lively fact filled expeditions into forests of the eastern United States Through Maloof s engaging conversa

  • Title: Teaching the Trees: Lessons from the Forest
  • Author: Joan Maloof
  • ISBN: 9780820329550
  • Page: 247
  • Format: Paperback
  • In this collection of natural history essays, biologist Joan Maloof embarks on a series of lively, fact filled expeditions into forests of the eastern United States Through Maloof s engaging, conversational style, each essay offers a lesson in stewardship as it explores the interwoven connections between a tree species and the animals and insects whose lives depend on it In this collection of natural history essays, biologist Joan Maloof embarks on a series of lively, fact filled expeditions into forests of the eastern United States Through Maloof s engaging, conversational style, each essay offers a lesson in stewardship as it explores the interwoven connections between a tree species and the animals and insects whose lives depend on it and who, in turn, work to ensure the tree s survival.Never really at home in a laboratory, Maloof took to the woods early in her career Her enthusiasm for firsthand observation in the wild spills over into her writing, whether the subject is the composition of forest air, the eagle s preference for nesting in loblolly pines, the growth rings of the bald cypress, or the gray squirrel s fondness for weevil infested acorns With a storyteller s instinct for intriguing particulars, Maloof expands our notions about what a tree is through her many asides about the six species of leafhoppers who eat only syca leaves or the midges who live inside holly berries and somehow prevent them from turning red.As a scientist, Maloof accepts that trees have a spiritual dimension that cannot be quantified As an unrepentant tree hugger, she finds support in the scientific case for biodiversity As an activist, she can t help but wonder how much time is left for our forests.

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      Published :2018-08-01T23:10:46+00:00

    One thought on “Teaching the Trees: Lessons from the Forest”

    1. I read this over a few weeks, one tree at a time, almost like a devotional. And that’s what this book is, at least in part: devotional, textbook, memoir. Joan Maloof uses the phrase, “Now look deeper…” to take the reader beyond leaves, branches, trunk, and bark and see a world within a world. She says of her farmhouse on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, “This is the most beautiful place on Earth. There are many such places.” (Edward Abbey, Desert Solitaire) The trees she talks about [...]

    2. I had the fortune of hearing Joan Maloof speak at a conference. I snatched up the last copy of this book and she signed it. I enjoyed reading these short essays about some of our native tree species and the complex life cycles of the little-known insects who depend on them. She has a meandering style that was hard to follow in one or two places, and once or twice she was overly preachy, but overall I did not find that this detracted from the book. An unexpected treat was the exquisite pencil dra [...]

    3. This was a typical natural history narrative that had many interesting explanations of tree-animal interactions. I particularly enjoyed the descriptions of insect and other invertebrate interactions and the historical illustrations that accompanied them. I could do without the author's opinions though, but maybe that is because most of my values and beliefs regarding nature were formed years ago and I don't need to waste time reading to more green rants. Perhaps young students will find her plea [...]

    4. This book is full of fairytale-like stories about the complex interrelationships among organisms, such as beech trees, tway-blade orchids, which only grow under beech trees, their pollinating fungus gnats, and several fungus species that make it all possible. It's also full of anger and sadness about the clear-cutting of our forests, and all the lives we lose when we lose our trees. The author's anger is appropriate, but I wonder if showing us more of the wonder and grace of our forests, helping [...]

    5. A gem of a book. Full of fascinating, lovingly observed details about the community of animals, insects, fungus, and other life that live in symbiotic relationship with trees in forests. Indeed, if one word could sum up the stories, it would be "relationship." The author's voice is friendly, conversational, and sympathetic, possibly belying her decades of experience and knowledge of trees and forests. Her admiration for the intricacies of creatures and the miracle of life cycles is contagious, w [...]

    6. Easliy readable in one sitting, this little volume of natural history makes you appreciate the intricacies of nature. A casual glimpse of the book's title would lead you to believe it's simply about trees, and, of course, there are many trees discussed therein. However, Maloof takes an ecological view of each tree and goes beyond a simple description of the genus and species, taking the reader on an adventure through the eyes of a moth, a fly, or a snail. Everything is connected, after all, and [...]

    7. I loved this book. She was passionate without being preachy. I liked the format of shorter essays. The design was gorgeous and the writing beautiful. Great vacation read.

    8. Maloof writes with great passion about the trees in her area (Maryland) which inspires me to look more closely at the trees and understory of my Midwest trees. She chooses a few of her favorites and includes short essays on their identification and the circle of life that supports and nurtures them. I now have a greater appreciation for fungus and beneficial bugs! Interspersed with her prose are some of her favorite text from the poet, Rilke which adds to the essay and the speaks to her introduc [...]

    9. Wonderfully written and thoroughly enjoyable, although I found myself filled with equal parts exhilaration and despair from page to page. ("We grow too soon old and too late smart.") It's incredible not how little I know personally - that's actually to be expected - but how much we overlook as a species, particularly on a societal level. It makes me want to study ecology.You can read an excerpt on the OBOD site here.

    10. I love Joan Maloof's passion for trees, her knowledge of the diverse ecosystems of trees, her prose around trees, and her mission for the preservation of treesAfter reading this book I wish I could go on a tree walk with Joan Maloof and listen to her talk of the nature of the trees. But knowing that isn't very probable, I am inspired by her words, to begin some form of study regarding trees.

    11. The writing is poetry in prose. Through the family grapevine, Joan is a childhood next door neighbor. It's nice to see someone I knew as child (both of us) so inspired by the natural world.

    12. "the Druids also protected oak trees. They believed that the trees held spirits that could whisper prophecies to them."word.

    13. Enjoyable for me because I love trees with a passion. Lots of interesting ecological tidbits. A little preachy sometimes.

    14. This is a beautifully written book If you love the outdoors and want to learn about the forests you hike in this is a great book to read

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