The Authority, Vol. 2

The Authority Vol The Authority now under Jack Hawksmoor s leadership following Jenny Sparks death at the end of the th Century face multiple foes such as a mad scientist and his army of superhumans who wanted to i

  • Title: The Authority, Vol. 2
  • Author: Mark Millar Frank Quitely Various
  • ISBN: 9781401242756
  • Page: 212
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Authority, now under Jack Hawksmoor s leadership following Jenny Sparks death at the end of the 20th Century, face multiple foes such as a mad scientist and his army of superhumans who wanted to influence the 21st Century through Jenny Spark s successor Jenny Quantum, a previous Doctor who manipulated the Earth itself, and a duplicate team of superheroes modeled on thThe Authority, now under Jack Hawksmoor s leadership following Jenny Sparks death at the end of the 20th Century, face multiple foes such as a mad scientist and his army of superhumans who wanted to influence the 21st Century through Jenny Spark s successor Jenny Quantum, a previous Doctor who manipulated the Earth itself, and a duplicate team of superheroes modeled on the Authority that was created and backed by the G7 group of nations.Collects THE AUTHORY 13 29

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      Published :2019-03-05T17:24:08+00:00

    One thought on “The Authority, Vol. 2”

    1. Mark Millar takes the writing baton from Warren Ellis for most of this volume. Where Ellis was like Muhammed Ali, jabbing and dancing around his opponent, looking lyrical and purty, Millar is more like Mike Tyson (in his prime, not the crazy-pants, ear-biting version), launching huge smoking uppercuts, going for maximum damage quickly.Both Millar and Ellis skew super hero conventions via their work on The Authority, Vol. 1, but Millar, author of Kick-Ass, has a more brutal, bone-crunching black [...]

    2. Vol. 2 of the Authority takes Warren Ellis' great work on Vol. 1 (12 issues) and continues it through the Mark Millar filter. This could have gone either way really, but thankfully, this is a very strong follow up, with just enough change of feel and voice to make it different, yet similar enough to feel like a sequel, not a continuation of Ellis' work.That being said, Millar is doing some of his strongest work here, given characters who can be more or less what he wants them to be. I feel like [...]

    3. This was one craaazy book. Widescreen action, bigger-than-life characters, impossible stakes, and the writing so wrong, and yet so great. This is one of my all-time favourites. The Nativity is a masterpiece that ranks as one of my favourite stories ever, Earth Inferno was okay - would've been better with 100% Quitely art, Brave New World was insane - in a good way, and Transfer of Power was a lot of fun.But years ago I made the mistake of parting with the over-sized, slip-cased The Absolute Auth [...]

    4. I'm finding it very hard to rate this book, as I feel kind of morally compromised giving it 4 stars. On the one hand (the fun, entertainment-loving hand) this book is a full-speed action fest for the most part. It's a quick, blast of a read, with big, ridiculous world politics plots mixed in with superheroics by a bunch of hardcore activists who aren't afraid to murder anybody they see as wrong. It's a breath of fresh air, even today, a good 12 years since this Millar completed this story arc. I [...]

    5. *checks front of book**checks front of book again*No, this can't be right. I refuse to believe that I enjoyed a Mark Millar book this much. But it's true, this is even more fun and full of the widescreen action and amazing set pieces that made Warren Ellis' Authority run so iconic. Whilst the whole 'one arc gets derailed by the next arc' is kind of odd halfway through, this is a really solid read that is exactly how you can do superheroes in a world where there are basically no rules. I'm not a [...]

    6. Thnax, Marcus Coleman, for insisting I read this. The frames I glimpsed when he was flipping through this volume and confirming it was something he wanted me to read all make so much sense now. They were quite disturbing without context. The Mark Millar-written stories were my favorite, and the Frank Quitely-drawn panels were the style I liked most. Everyone else (Tom Peyer, Dustin Nguyen, Arthur Adams, and numerous other artists) did great work, too. The Re-Space scenery was wonderful; I was ho [...]

    7. The Authority is a superhero team composed of costumed heroes who don’t want to save the world. Instead, they focus on making the world worth saving, overthrowing dictators and defending countries against their aggressive neighbors. None of this makes them popular with governments, corporations, or the rest of the earth’s elite. Collecting issues 13–29 of the early 2000s run of this series, this hardcover edition finds Superman and Batman analogs, gay couple Apollo and Midnighter, nanotech [...]

    8. In contrast to all of the complex ideas that Warren Ellis displayed while writing The Authority, Mark Millar provides nothing of even the remotest interest or originality. For whatever reason, fake or pastiche versions of various characters seems to be the theme of every story, starting with parodies of the Avengers and X-Men as antagonists, followed by a previous version of the Doctor character as the villain, and finishing with an ersatz Authority that fights stand-ins for the Legion of Superh [...]

    9. Not quite as much fun as the first volume, but still quality stuff. The series seems to lose its way a bit towards the middle of the book, but manages to come back strong for the finish. Part of the problem may have been the shifting creative teams. I notice that one of the later chapters is billed as being, "Part 2 of 4," but Part 1 is nowhere to be found. There isn't any obvious gap in the storyline, so either it wasn't important--a recap issue or somethig--or the confusion of shifting teams r [...]

    10. Not as good as Ellis.Starts very good and slowly goes downhill.One issue is just a setup for the medicore Monarchy mini series which has not been collected for a while.Its fun to see more of Apollo and Midnighter but overal i won't be reading this again.

    11. Compare volume 1, written by Warren Ellis, to this volume written (for the most part)by Mark Millar is like comparing apples to hand grenades. Ellis is a clever, thought provoking writer who can develop interesting characters and even more interesting ideas and story lines. Millar is a shock-jock who, more often than not, goes over board with the violence and the gross. But one thing I can usually say about Millar he does it in an interesting way. I might not love his style but nobody does all o [...]

    12. Mark Millar was in a difficult spot when he took over the Authority. Following in the footsteps of Warren Ellis is never an easy place to be. Millar does his best, and he does his craziest, but the overall quality is a step down from the previous works.This book collects three major arcs - The first highlights Millar's ability to create completely screwball characters as a villainous despot throws huge numbers of super powered characters at them. It's silly, and the resolution surprises in a ple [...]

    13. The writing for this book is done very well. Millar provides some excellent stories in this tale. The first storyline involving the new Century Baby was a favorite of mine. The small references to Marvel superhero teams were somewhat done well, especially with Tank Man and his fate afterwards. Midnighter was my favorite from the group, considering how he was able to help take down a majority of the G-7 Authority that took their base over. The interaction between the characters was interesting to [...]

    14. It's interesting because Millar and Quitely do create a super team that takes on the powers that be as well as various supervillains. They in fact go so far as to say that most super heroes spend their time picking on poor people. However, the only way that a superhero team could do this is by becoming tyrants themselves. And that is exactly what I feel the authority does here. They don't take the time out to rule, they just claim the right to interfere and destroy whenever they deem it appropri [...]

    15. I did not love this one. It was tedious and lacked subtlety and complexity. There were a few redeeming qualities. For instance, I thought the various tortures inflicted on our heroes offered nice depth of emotion and characterization. I wish the alternate Authority characters had been more interesting. Their evils were so obviously evil, and without backstory explaining why they exhibited their particular brands of evil, so they were both flat and static when there was potential for much more.Th [...]

    16. This is a great follow up to volume 1, but it stumbles at the end. There was a ton of editorial interference when these issues were published, and what was printed did not reflect what was written. If you look around online you can find the whole story, but basically the editors thought the book was going too far. Overall though, it is still quite enjoyable.

    17. I hated the direction this book went. Hated the second team, had to make myself finish it, the only reason for the two stars is the Quitely art. Not sure if I understand Millar's thinking (or his editor's for that matter) putting such a despicable group of 'heroes' out there. Reflection of the world at the time it was written, I suppose.

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