Daisy Miller and Washington Square

Daisy Miller and Washington Square In Henry James s Daisy Miller a young American woman ventures into sophisticated European society where her naivete provokes scandal and tragedy Graham Greene called Washington Square the only novel

  • Title: Daisy Miller and Washington Square
  • Author: Henry James Jennie A. Kassanoff
  • ISBN: 9781593081058
  • Page: 180
  • Format: Paperback
  • In Henry James s Daisy Miller, a young American woman ventures into sophisticated European society, where her naivete provokes scandal and tragedy Graham Greene called Washington Square the only novel in which a man has successfully invaded the feminine field and produced work comparable to Jane Austen s Each work weaves an intricate tale of marriage, money, and maIn Henry James s Daisy Miller, a young American woman ventures into sophisticated European society, where her naivete provokes scandal and tragedy Graham Greene called Washington Square the only novel in which a man has successfully invaded the feminine field and produced work comparable to Jane Austen s Each work weaves an intricate tale of marriage, money, and manners.

    • [PDF] Download ✓ Daisy Miller and Washington Square | by Æ Henry James Jennie A. Kassanoff
      180 Henry James Jennie A. Kassanoff
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ✓ Daisy Miller and Washington Square | by Æ Henry James Jennie A. Kassanoff
      Posted by:Henry James Jennie A. Kassanoff
      Published :2019-03-03T12:51:24+00:00

    One thought on “Daisy Miller and Washington Square”

    1. I am reviewing here only Daisy Miller as I have read and reviewed Washington Square separately. I wasn't sure what to expect from this novella but I did expect characters that would grab my attention and make me care about them, their stories, the writing itself, something. Instead, sadly, I found myself not caring much at all which is probably the greatest condemnation of all. It was just OK. the writing was fine and I actually liked James' authorial asides (though I wonder if they should have [...]

    2. My version contains both Washington Square and Daisy Miller; I read Washington Square as a joint read with friends, and we will read Daisy Miller later this year.Washington Square - a very 'readable' classic for sure. I had wanted to read this ever since reading Reading Lolita in Tehran. Overall I found the story of our heroine, Catherine Sloper, to be quite tragic. I felt her life was always manipulated and controlled by others. But in the story's end, I for one was very pleased as I felt she f [...]

    3. I saw the film version of Washington Square with Olivia DeHavilland and then the stage play with Cherry Jones. Both were extremely good and I thoroughly enjoyed it, but, I think the book provided insight to the minds of the character. The transformation of Catherine, from the shy and timid girl to a woman of confidence, certainly allowed me to explore how a mind works. Of course, it was difficult to point finger who's at fault, since there was no one, but, the author James, certainly gave each c [...]

    4. Daisy Miller. The story is told from the perspective of Winterbourne, a 27-year old American man who was educated in Europe, who is currently in Switzerland. He meets a beautiful young American lady, Daisy Miller, and is really quite taken with her.Daisy first appears to be the typical coquette, flirtatious and trying to attract all the eligible young men. As Winterbourne learns, Daisy is anything but typical. She disregards all the expectations that young ladies are subject to; she breaks all t [...]

    5. "Daisy Miller" and "Washington Square" are separate works in the same book.Daisy Miller - 62 pages long. Follows the classic 19th century plot of 'Behold, reader! A beautiful young society woman does things which her companions judge scandalous, but which don't really seem like that big a deal! Now everyone is talking about her and turning their backs on her! She starts to get a little worried, but acts brave and tragic and romantic! Oh crap, she just died." It's hard to sympathize with Daisy be [...]

    6. Daisy Miller was just ok for me but I loved Washington Square. My heart just goes out plain and lonely Catherine Sloper. Her days consist of needlework and insults from her stuck up rich father, Dr. Sloper. When she finally has a chance of finding true love with the dashing Morris Townsend, Dr. Sloper believe he is the worst of libertines and is only after Catherine's fortune. A must read. I also recommend the wonderful black and white classic The Heiress starring Oliva De Havelind, Montgomery C [...]

    7. What a beautiful editorial decision, pairing these two novellas together. James' two complex, well-drawn heroines are seeming opposites; nonetheless they both wrestle with the selfishness of loved ones, and more broadly, with the strict social conventions of Gilded Age America.

    8. Expecting more from a classic, I am left only feeling great sadness. Catherine could have been so much more!

    9. Out of the two stories, I have to say that I liked Washington Square better. It was very much engaging and I was extremely curious to see where it all ends. Catherine was not a regular type of heroine, but the depiction of a real person with no high points in her personality or looks. She found herself in a very difficult position where she had to choose (view spoiler)[ between her parent and her lover (hide spoiler)]. Nobody made her decision easier and everyone seemed to want to control her fa [...]

    10. Had a whole class on James (and Twain) in college; I remember so many twists and levels of complexity. Not an easy read - but well worth the work.

    11. This week’s headline? Suitor’s motives questionedWhy this book? Interest in authorWhich book format? Library - collected worksPrimary reading environment? Holidays in bedAny preconceived notions? Vaguely unhappy endingIdentify most with? Aunt Lavinia PennimanThree-word quote? “Come back? Damnation!”Goes well with? Almonds and champagneIn the pages of a beloved and thrice-read bargain bin novel, The Pursuit of Happiness, a character asks “Are you a Jamesian?”The scene brings with it l [...]

    12. Washington Square:I've only read these two stories by Henry James, so perhaps this is his style, but like Daisy Miller, there was so much buildup and character/plot development leading up to the coming together of Catherine and Morris, and then it was dashed away! It was rather intense of a process, and I even stayed up late to finish it. Just not sure if it was worth it. Again, I don't mind tragic endings, but this book was heartbreaking.This book seemed to have been primarily about Catherine's [...]

    13. My version contains both Washington Square and Daisy Miller; I read Washington Square as a joint read with friends, and we will read Daisy Miller later this year.

    14. Now, this is two short books, combined into one, and let's be honest, Daisy Miller is a story that is read in one sitting. (And if the fact that I read it in one sitting makes me a nerd, so be it.)Daisy Miller starts with our narrator, Westbourne, meeting a bratty little boy who asks him for sugar cubes because his mother has refused to give him anymore candy. (And you later find out the child NEVER sleeps so I wonder why. Then he meets Daisy. The most beautiful girl he has ever seen. Although t [...]

    15. Again dipping into the classics that I have thus far not been exposed to, these are the first Henry James novels that I have read. Although some might dislike these two stories for their thiness of plot, the wonderful character development and interpersonal interactions that they contain are wonderfully wrought.Set and written in England in the 1880's (ish) Daisy Miller is a short (68 page) exposee of a flirtaceous (spelling?) young american tourist travelling in Europe and her uncaring scandalo [...]

    16. I adore Henry James, so it's sad that this is my first time reading these two fantastic novellas; and such depth in characterizations both are!Daisy Miller is a haunting sketch of a girl's downfall from society, and how effortless it is all painted up by James! The narrator's perspective of a naive European-born American struck by the nuances of society offers such a hopeful view of Miss Miller; he instructs us as readers to give her the benefit of the doubt and sympathy he would give.Washington [...]

    17. First off, Daisy Miller. Daisy Miller is a quintessential American stereotype; brash, pretty, and little on the simple side. A very bittersweet short story, but I feel that Henry James got his point across in a clever if macabre way. Secondly, Washington Square.After the letdown that was the end of Daisy Miller, Washington Square delves deeper into sadness with Washington Square, eventually bobbing up to mildly depressed apathy for the grand finale. Both stories hinge on the main character being [...]

    18. I only wanted to read 'Daisy Miller', i read 'Washington Square' years back but never this little novelette. I don't know what i think of this one. I heard a review of it in the book 'How to read literature like a professor' by Foster, which made me want to read it, likening Winterbourne to a cultural vampire and Daisy as an innocent, like 'Portrait of a Lady'. and perhaps that is what was intended by the author. But I'm afraid I didn't enjoy any of the characters, I didn't like the snobbery (bo [...]

    19. A rich, beautiful, flirtatious young lady, an American, travels with her submissive mother and younger brother in Switzerland and Italy. In Switzerland, she meets an American expatriot, Winterbourne, himself a bachelor, who becomes captivated with Daisy, yet maintains himself apart. Winterbourne next encounters Daisy in Rome. There, contrary to Winterbourne's counsel, Daisy upsets the mores of European society be permitting herself to go out alone and unchaperoned with dashing European men, part [...]

    20. As a teenager, I was forced by my ‘evil’ literature teacher to read Henry James’s novel ‘The Turn of the Screw’ and I hated every little second of that tale. However, I have decided to forgive Henry that ill, and have recently been attempting to read more from this – according to – ‘key figure in 19th-century literary realism’.I started with the short story ‘Daisy Miller’ and then moved my way over to ‘Washington Square’. ‘Washington Square’ was an easy, not thorou [...]

    21. It's kind of hard to give a rating on these - I think Daisy Miller deserves on 2 starts - definitely was not a fan of any of the characters. I actually like Washington Square. This is the one that actually received the 3 stars. I enjoyed the character development a lot better. The language of both novels was quite dense and neither story was amazing or really drew me in. I just thought it was time to read some classics - well task accomplished. Not sure if I'll be trying another Henry James nove [...]

    22. The style is great and the characterization is phenomenal. As far the story line goes, I just am not interested in apparently witless or defiant Victorian(?) female whether she is dull (Catherine) or intriguing (Daisy). I read these two stories because I am reading Reading Lolita in Tehran. Perhaps the stories are stagnant because they are so real. I enjoyed Daisy Miller more as she made her own drama, and I found the dialogue more engaging. Catherine Sloper was frustrating, and to be redudant, [...]

    23. I teach Daisy Miller (the novella) and I do enjoy this 60 page story. It's Henry James at his simplest but replete with clever characterization, irony, symbolism and a host of themes like the attitudes of the Amerian expats in Europe vs. the American nouveaux riches visiting Europe (in the 1880s).The mysterious Daisy remains a mystery until the very end.I think F. Scott Fitzgerald must have taken her name for his enigmatic Daisy in The Great Gatsby.

    24. I really enjoyed both short stories. It may have had more to do with my mood while reading them, but I like the stark differences in the heroines in each story. I realize that's the point of putting them together in one book, but I thought it was a great experience to read about them back to back.

    25. In my opinion the overall story was amusing but the character, Daisy, was highly annoying. As she was introduced, I thought her personality would be one of morals and high self-esteem. As the story continues the audience finds a young woman who is controversial to society's expectations and herself. Her true intentions were never completely understood and we view a woman who we dislike yet pity.

    26. Daisy Miller, unlike my previous read of 'The Catcher in the Rye', did not pose quite an interesting theme, but was a quick and satisfying read. Taking an 'inside looking out' perspective of the older Roman society, Daisy Miller, the protagonist of this 'drama', posed almost as an entire antithesis to the foundation of Roman society, everything she was, Roman society detested greatly.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *