The West without Water: What Past Floods, Droughts, and Other Climatic Clues Tell Us about Tomorrow

The West without Water What Past Floods Droughts and Other Climatic Clues Tell Us about Tomorrow The West without Water documents the tumultuous climate of the American West over twenty millennia with tales of past droughts and deluges and predictions about the impacts of future climate change o

  • Title: The West without Water: What Past Floods, Droughts, and Other Climatic Clues Tell Us about Tomorrow
  • Author: B. Lynn Ingram Frances Malamud-Roam
  • ISBN: 9780520268555
  • Page: 411
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The West without Water documents the tumultuous climate of the American West over twenty millennia, with tales of past droughts and deluges and predictions about the impacts of future climate change on water resources Looking at the region s current water crisis from the perspective of its climate history, the authors ask the central question of what is normal climate fThe West without Water documents the tumultuous climate of the American West over twenty millennia, with tales of past droughts and deluges and predictions about the impacts of future climate change on water resources Looking at the region s current water crisis from the perspective of its climate history, the authors ask the central question of what is normal climate for the West, and whether the relatively benign climate of the past century will continue into the future.The West without Water merges climate and paleoclimate research from a wide variety of sources as it introduces readers to key discoveries in cracking the secrets of the region s climatic past It demonstrates that extended droughts and catastrophic floods have plagued the West with regularity over the past two millennia and recounts the most disastrous flood in the history of California and the West, which occurred in 1861 62 The authors show that, while the West may have temporarily buffered itself from such harsh climatic swings by creating artificial environments and human landscapes, our modern civilization may be ill prepared for the future climate changes that are predicted to beset the region They warn that it is time to face the realities of the past and prepare for a future in which fresh water may be less reliable.Read an excerpt here The West without Water What Past Floods, Droughts, and Other Climatic Clues Tell Us about Tomorrow by B L by University of California Press

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      Published :2019-01-21T18:41:28+00:00

    One thought on “The West without Water: What Past Floods, Droughts, and Other Climatic Clues Tell Us about Tomorrow”

    1. Top notch, crystal clear scientific and history writing. Thorough without being pedantic, dogmatic or dense. Proportionally about 90% science and 10% policy discussion. Very well done. The main point: our beloved mild, temperate and fairly stable CA climate is anomalous and has created a false sense of comfort for us. Extensive and severe droughts and floods are normal and climate change is already making these more severe. If that's not enough to get you to read this, there's not much else I ca [...]

    2. "The West without Water" is a very readable book describing the historical climate of the Southwest United States going back for hundreds of thousands of years and more. Scientific temperature and rainfall records only go back for one hundred and fifty years or so, so evidence for the "normal" climate of the Southwest is based on proxy records. Proxies include analysis of tree-ring growth, bore holes, ice bores, radiocarbon dating techniques, chemical and microscopic analysis, lake bed analysis, [...]

    3. Interesting book that centers around the idea that climate has been historically quite variable and that the last few centuries have been abnormally bening givin rise to humas settling regions not suitable for long term inhabitation. The book does not really bring in any new facts but spends countless pages introducing tidbits of disjointed science that are better read elsewhere - it also feels repetitive as well. For the actual content at hand, this would have worked better as a long decent The [...]

    4. Based solely on its content, The West without Water certainly merits 4 or 5 stars for the impressive amount of research the authors have done, and the clear and sensible way in which they present it. Factoring in readability, however, is what ultimately led me to give it 3 stars. The authors attempted to keep the text from being too dry, but did not manage to do so for the bulk of the book. For one thing, they refer back to a number of studies, findings, events, etc. multiple times, and these re [...]

    5. Chapter 14 should be required reading for anyone living in the West. (The whole book, really.) the topic itself gets five stars for importance. This book's strengths are its careful cataloguing of many types of research on climate cycles. This painstaking walk-through of everything from tree ring data to plant pollen in lake sediments to the chemical makeup of drilled coral cores - it truly is an astonishing summary of a research literature. I learned a lot about methods for assessing climate ch [...]

    6. An eye-opener for me in terms of "the bigger picture". I had a pretty good understanding of recent climatic developments prior to reading the book, but had not really studied preceding large-scale changes going back tens of thousands of years. The detective work employed by paleo-climatologists to reconstruct past events was truly fascinating; again, while I had heard of some of the methods used (like radiocarbon dating and tree ring counting), others were completely new and I marveled at the in [...]

    7. The science behind California's water woes: too little, then too muchThis is a valuable book, well worth your attention, particularly for Californians. California gets almost all its rainfall in the winters, in just 5 or 6 big storms per year. If there are too few or too many storms. well, you see the problem.Drought is California's ongoing problem, but the worst potential weather disaster that the US Geological Survey has identified, is a repeat of the great California floods of 1861-62. A simi [...]

    8. Read thisAs a civil engineer, I recommend all read this book to understand where water comes from. It is a precious resource.

    9. It's nice to see the Left giving credence to paleoclimate and natural cycles. It's just too bad they have to spout the AGW nonsense throughout so as not to be deemed "deniers" and lose everything. These two remind me of Brian Fagan. It's spineless, but at least it informs the Left of natural cycles. It's poorly written and extremely redundant, but somewhat informative.

    10. This book gives a good idea of what problems California will have in the future. There are more people living in this arid area than nature can support. The book was a bit tough to get through, but they do give information about some of the latest research into both current problems and how they have figured out what has happened in the past.

    11. Very informative. Natural and human caused climate change will likely lead to a less habitable and mostly dryer west, interspersed with large floods. The western interior will likely not sustain the current population inexpensively, and if you live in Sacramento, buy a dingy now.

    12. Not sure that six months ago, I would have found this as interesting, but with the current California drought situation, I could not put this down. Floods, fires, overpopulation, El Nino, La Nina, this book covers it in a really easy to understand way.

    13. This book really gives perspective on our current crisis. The writing can get a bit textbook-ish, but it really makes you think about how maybe the American West wasn't meant to be populated.

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