Corpus Mysticum: The Eucharist and the Church in the Middle Ages

Corpus Mysticum The Eucharist and the Church in the Middle Ages One of the major figures of twentieth century Catholic theology Henri Cardinal de Lubac was known for his attention to the doctrine of the church and its life within the contemporary world In Corpus

  • Title: Corpus Mysticum: The Eucharist and the Church in the Middle Ages
  • Author: Henri de Lubac Gemma Simmonds
  • ISBN: 9780268025939
  • Page: 427
  • Format: Paperback
  • One of the major figures of twentieth century Catholic theology, Henri Cardinal de Lubac was known for his attention to the doctrine of the church and its life within the contemporary world In Corpus Mysticum de Lubac investigates a particular understanding of the relation of the church to the eucharist He sets out the nature of the church as communion, a doctrine that iOne of the major figures of twentieth century Catholic theology, Henri Cardinal de Lubac was known for his attention to the doctrine of the church and its life within the contemporary world In Corpus Mysticum de Lubac investigates a particular understanding of the relation of the church to the eucharist He sets out the nature of the church as communion, a doctrine that influenced the thinking of the Second Vatican Council.With the publication of Corpus Mysticum, this important text of contemporary Catholic ecclesiology and sacramental theology is available for the first time in an English translation Its publication fills a significant gap in the range of de Lubac s works available to English speaking scholars It will be an important resource in the widespread and ongoing ecumenical discussions among Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox theologians.His Eminence Henri Cardinal de Lubac, SJ 1896 1991 , a French Jesuit, is considered to be one of the most influential theologians of the twentieth century He is the author of a number of books, including Catholicism and Theology in History.Gemma Simmonds CJ is lecturer at Heythrop College, University of London Richard Price is Lecturer at Heythrop College, University of London This translation of Corpus Mysticum is a gift to medieval historians, liturgists, ecclesiologists, and any Christian interested in a profoundly prophetic reading of one of the central mysteries of her or his religion This is one of a very few books that has formed our present consciousness of who we are as Catholics and Christians To preserve access to it will significantly aid our attempts to move into a future to some extent already foreshadowed in de Lubac s study of the past Gary Macy, University of San Diego

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      427 Henri de Lubac Gemma Simmonds
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      Posted by:Henri de Lubac Gemma Simmonds
      Published :2018-012-12T14:48:40+00:00

    One thought on “Corpus Mysticum: The Eucharist and the Church in the Middle Ages”

    1. De Lubac outlines the origins and evolution of the “three-fold Body of Christ,” particularly as its known by the term “corpus mysticum,” the mystical body. It is tempting to read earlier phrases for the church—such as “the body of Christ”—back into the phrase “mystical body,” and define it that way. De Lubac warns against that move, since either the phrase “mystical body” (hereafter MB) is either rare in the Fathers or is not used in the later medieval sense. The threefo [...]

    2. A rich and complicated account of the development of the "threefold body of Christ" in the medieval period.

    3. What is worth keeping in de Lubac's historical accounts of the development of theology (my favorite aspect of doing theology, so to speak) is that in the process of developing doctrines or formulations of truth, there is always something lost. Therefore, we need to pay attention to what fades or else we miss the important things that are part of it. Corpus Mysticum: The Eucharist and the Church in the Middle Ages shows how de Lubac turned to the theology of the Eucharist, and points out that in [...]

    4. The book is long and deals with arcane subject matter in excruciating detail. I loved it. This book is not exactly accesible, but it is difficult to overstate its importance for the subject at hand. 20th Century Christian ecclesiology has been revolutionized by de Lubac's careful analysis of the development of the relationship between the Church and the Eucharist through the Middle Ages. It seems to me that the next question is, "If ecclesiology had to be re-imagined because of its intrinsic rel [...]

    5. For what it is, a study into the specifics of the transference of the phrase "mystical body" from the eucharist to the church in medieval Catholicism, this book is unrivaled. That is, of course, a very narrow subsection of interests, and most theologians would do well to consult a summary of the content of this book. What everyone, especially Protestant readers, needs to engage with directly is de Lubac's conclusion and the following material, effectively an essay for which the historical survey [...]

    6. The plethora of quotes by Patristic, Middle age, and medieval theologians that I've not found in many other places may be worth the price of the book. I felt like the points could have been made in about 150 pages shorter, but it was certainly worth the read in just exposing the reader to new theologians throughout the ages of the church.

    7. A challenging read with lots of historical characters and theological quotes. De Lubac gives us a ton of early medieval quotes that sound very Protestant (Calvin) but then is very dismissive of a rather straightforward reading of their "spiritual" teaching on the Eucharist.

    8. Reading the book for an analytical essay. All about the phrase "mystical body" and how it's been used in the Church am I nerd if I really and truly enjoy this stuff?

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